DEBUNKING RESOURCES

Our work is informed by the latest research on misinformation, psychology, science communication, and social media.

Check below for summaries of recent research and debunking resources, provided by the University of Alberta’s Health Law Institute.

Spreading misinformation associated with mental health concerns?

Misinformation more emotional and negative in tone.

Yet more research links online misinformation to vaccine hesitancy.

ScienceUpFirst CSPC Panel – Innovative tools to debunk COVID-19 misinformation

Throughout the pandemic there has been a significant increase in misinformation and conspiracy theories surrounding public health and science that threaten the health and safety of Canadians. Misinformation has greatly contributed to vaccine hesitancy and distrust in public health measures, and has led to anti-mask, anti-lockdown rallies. More importantly, underserved and marginalized communities have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19 due to inequities in our healthcare system. Therefore, it is important that we dispel misinformation around vaccines and create trusting environments in a culturally sensitive manner.

Science Up First presented this panel on tools and strategies some experts use when tackling misinformation.

Does format matter when correcting misinformation?

Huge portion of U.S. population influenced by misinformation.

Take a break from the noise!

Avoid the doom-scrolling!

Social media is a BIG part of the problem

Misinformation spreads fast and far

When it comes to misinformation, don’t trust your gut

People value efforts to counter misinformation

Nudging people to pause and think about accuracy can help

Yes, Debunking Works!